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Author: Pamela

Bangkok can be, at times, a rather intense city. In 2010, the city had a population of about 8.2 million people –– this doesn’t take into account the number of tourists/backpackers in the city –– all of whom need to, somehow, get around Bangkok. Thankfully, the city’s transportation infrastructure is pretty solid and easy to navigate.

It’s been a long day (or more) of travel as you slog through the customs line at Bangkok’s Suvarnabhumi International Airport (BKK), you’re tired, hungry and want to stop moving (and probably have a long shower as well), there is only one problem, you still need to get to your hotel or hostel. Thankfully getting from the Bangkok airport to the city centre is not a difficult task.

Sitting on one of the windowsills in my apartment, I survey my surroundings. Black reusable shopping bags filled with food, books, and other household items are strewn around the floor in the kitchen and living area; two black and country style kitchen chairs waiting to be placed, a white laundry basket filled with cosy blankets; two large cardboard boxes from IKEA are ripped open on the ground.

I love Bangkok. It is a multifaceted city; then again most cities are. While many travellers decide to skip Bangkok, or only spend a day or two in the city, I like to stay awhile. Why? Because it is awesome, and there are still so many things I want to see/do/experience there (and share with you guys). The following is a list of experiences that I think ALL OF YOU should consider doing in Bangkok.

You've made the first step, you've decided to say no to riding elephants, and yes to visiting or volunteering with elephants in a sanctuary that promote health, freedom, and natural behaviour, now what? What should you know about being a volunteer? If you're visiting for a day, how should you dress or behave? What are the unspoken rules for interacting with elephants in a sanctuary like Elephant Nature Park?