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Pamela MacNaughtan

I sit in my foldable green canvas camp chair and lean back gently and look up. I’ve done this almost every night, but tonight is the first night (since the Serengeti) that the sky is full of stars. I was dazzled by them as I slowly turned my head from one side to the other. The stars were bright against the dark sky and in the distance, I could hear a light wind whistling through the trees.

Each night in Zimbabwe is the same, a sparkling starry sky.

In Matabos, as the sun disappeared behind the horizon, a chill crept up and had most of us shivering and dreading the night ahead of us. Most of us sat around the campfire, watching the hot flames licking the dry wood, crackling from time to time and sending orange embers into the night air. I couldn’t help but stare at the fire, then slowly look up and stare at the stars before looking back down at the fire.

Many of us were in semi-philosophical moods, and the conversation around the campfire soon turned to one about love and life.

“Oh! Look!” Lisa said in excitement

I looked to my left quickly and was rewarded by the sight of a falling meteorite. The once black sky was now a much lighter blue as the meteorite fell towards the earth. It was close, close enough for us to see the yellow, orange and blue flames. I’ve seen a meteorite before, but never this close. It was beautiful. I know that’s a cliché, but I cannot think of any other way to describe it.

Once the meteorite had disappeared, I quickly closed my eyes to make a wish. Sure, it’s a rather silly thing to do, but at the time it felt like the best idea in the world. Soon afterward I went back to looking at the fire and the stars as I listened to the others talk about how amazing the meteorite was.

Zimbabwe is quickly becoming one of my favourite countries on this trip. In Harare, it was the friendliness of the people that captured my interest. In Matabos it was the dark sparkling sky. Each day I grow even more fond of this country and each day I wish I had more time to explore it.

Zimbabwe may have a troubled past and an uncertain future (according to the media), but sitting at home, listening to the news, is a lot different than being in Zimbabwe and experiencing it first hand. I don’t want to think about the day that I’ll leave Zimbabwe for Botswana. For now, I’m content to sit on my foldable green canvas camp chair, lean back slowly and look up at the dark starry sky.

Thinking of traveling to Africa?

Traveling in Africa, solo, can be a scary thought -especially for solo female travelers. I’m not saying it can’t be done, it can. What I am saying is that there is nothing wrong with joining a group tour.

For 45 days I traveled from Kenya (Nairobi) to Cape Town with Intrepid Travel. This was my very first group travel experience. At first I wasn’t sure what I had gotten myself into, but as time progressed, I began to relax and fall in love with this type of travel. In fact, I would definitely travel with Intrepid again. 

Comments:

  • August 29, 2011

    I hope your wish comes true!!!

    reply...
  • August 30, 2011

    Seattle Pam, you always know the right thing to say. 😉

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  • August 30, 2011

    “Zimbabwe may have a troubled past and an uncertain future (according to the media), but sitting at home, listening to the news, is a lot different than being in Zimbabwe and experiencing it first hand.” 
    Well said!! Beautiful post. 

    reply...

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